Archive

Posts Tagged ‘marketing places’

5 Basic Communication Rules

August 25, 2009 3 comments

I dropped my oldest child, now a freshman, off at school to attend his first high school dance tonight. I’d already cautioned him about appropriate behaviour, being where he was supposed to be when he was supposed to be there, etc., etc., when I realized I was delivering the same admonitions my own parents slung at me before my first “real” dance way back when. I took a deep breath, looked him squarely in the eyes, and told him I knew that he knew what I expected from him, and I knew he’d come through. And to have a good time.

Now, I’m not a new-age parent, or parent-as-friend practitioner, either. We walk on the stricter side of life when it comes to expectations and consequences. I know that my son understands what my expectations are because I’ve clearly communicated them to him over the course of many, many interactions. I also know he understands the consequences if he violates my trust in him because he’s experienced those many times as well.

Clear communication is the foundation for successful interactions, be they in business, among friends and co-workers, or between parents and children. Do you…

  1. Clearly communicate what you want to have happen in a given situation? Be home by 9:30. Call us to set up a free appointment to evaluate your current materials. Order online.
  2. Clearly explain any options or choices? Think of menus in restaurants, options on cars, travel packages… so many things could be improved through clear communication of any choices the buyer may have. My kid can either have me drop him off and pick him up, or one of the parents I know and trust among a select group of his friends. Those are the options.
  3. Set expectations for timeframes and urgency? If the deal expires at MIDNIGHT, let me know! If your grass seed only performs optimally when planted in March, tell me. If coming home 2 minutes past 9:30 is still considered late, better let the kid know.
  4. Revisit the important points as needed? Did your kids eat their vegetables after only telling them to do so one time? Mine didn’t either. Sometimes you need to repeat yourself in your copy, in your verbal presentation or in your parenting.
  5. Deliver the promised results? If he’s late, he’s grounded. When we say it will ship today, it will ship today. It really is a free, no strings attached evaluation of your current marketing material.

If you clearly set expectations with your customers (or your kids), including noting the choices or options available, sharing any relevant urgency, reminding them of the important parts and delivering what you promised, your interactions will be much more fruitful.

Have any additional basic communication rules? Please share them in the comments.

A Primer for Cities on Retail Development

Co-authored by Rickey Hayes and Mandy Vavrinak

More and more cities and communities are realizing that growing their retail base wisely is an integral part of any balanced and long-term economic development strategy. Not every city can support extensive retail; overbuilding in some categories and areas has contributed to today’s economic woes in the retail sector. However, many areas are still significantly underretailed and opportunities exist for both savvy cities and smart retailers. Since fewer retailers are moving in this challenging environment, competition for those new projects and locations is fierce. How can a city help get its name on the expansion list? Here are some tips we’ve found to be effective as we help cities recruit new businesses:

  1. Believe in and utilize public/private partnerships. Cities can assemble land, provide needed public infrastructure and ensue the development process is as pain-free and efficient as possible. Now is the time for innovate approaches to incentives and improving internal processes.
  2. Know your city/sites well, from a development perspective. What would make them attractive (or not) to a particular retailer? Does the site fit the retailer’s criteria?
  3. Get your demographic house in order. Using the numbers from the last census is NOT providing current, actionable information for the site selection process. Numbers generated via internal studies (not independently verifiable) are also not helpful. Use a reputable source for solid demographics based on a reasonable trade area.
  4. Understand the development process from the development side. Knowing how to work with site selectors, brokers, developers, leasing agents and retailers is crucial to ensure a smooth process and positive outcome.
  5. Craft a marketing position and use it. If your city logo/motto reflects 150 years of history but not where you’re headed, or what new residents or businesses can expect in the future, you’ve missed an opportunity to shine. If your web site looks like an internal project, you’ve missed another one. Cities selling themselves need the same tools as other companies with products to sell… good logo, solid identity, good product information, great marketing vehicles to share it all.
  6. Own your own economic development efforts. Chambers of Commerce, industrial development authorities, and other quasi-governmental bodies cannot “pull the trigger” on projects, yet the decision-making process and the ability to get things done in a consistent manner is an integral part of economic growth and development.

It’s not easy to get noticed by national retailers and other site selectors, but using these tips will help your community put its best foot forward and increase the chances you’ll get a shot at new business expansions or developments.

Cross-posted at NAI Commerce One blog and at citiesofvision blog.

Rickey Hayes is the principal of Retail Attractions, LLC http://www.retailattractions.com, a firm dedicated to helping cities and developers successfully find retail sites, close deals and improve the quality of life for our client cities. Mandy Vavrinak is the principal of Crossroads Communications, LLC, http://www.crossroadscommunications.com, a firm dedicated to effectively marketing places and spaces and specializing in working with retailers and cities. They’ve successfully partnered on a number of projects, attracting more than 6 million square feet of retail to the right locations over the past 6 years.